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Finding Aid for the Ryoichi Fujii Papers, 1919-1999
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Description
Ryoichi Fujii (1905-1983) was a bilingual journalist, political commentator, and political activist. Between 1936 and 1940, he was a member of the American Communist Party active in Southern California. During the wartime years, Fujii was interned first at Santa Anita and then at Heart Mountain. As an advocate of cooperation with the American government, he was a key figure in the resettlement phase of internment, especially in the Chicago area. In 1945, he founded the Chicago Shimpo. As an editor and writer, he was an outspoken opponent of McCarthyism, white racism, the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security Pact, and the Vietnam War and a supporter of the civil rights movement. Besides his prolific writings as a newpaperman, he was also the author of Shikago Nikkeijinshi (c.1968), a history of Japanese-Americans in Chicago. The collection consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence files, Newsletters no.1-34 (1944-45), precursor to the Chicago Shimpo, office records of the Chicago Shimpo Company (1945-1970), clippings of newspaper articles by Fujii, documents and correspondence relating to Fujii's own postwar deportation proceedings, essays on the wartime internment, U.S.-Japan relations, and other topics, rough drafts of his autobiography, reports written for the WRA (1942-44), WRA publications and reports, and miscellaneous papers and personal memorabilia.
Background
Ryoichi Fujii (1905-1983) was a bilingual journalist, political commentator, and political activist. Born as Asano Katsu in Gifu city in Gifu Prefecture, he was known as “Bob” Fujii in English. A graduate of Doshisha University, Fujii came to the U.S. as a student in 1931, where he attended Oberlin and received his M.A. in 1934. Between 1936 and 1940, he was a member of the American Communist Party active in Southern California. During the wartime years, Fujii was interned first at Santa Anita and then at Heart Mountain. As an advocate of cooperation with the American government, he was a key figure in the resettlement phase of internment, especially in the Chicago area. In 1945 he founded the Chicago Shimpo. As an editor and writer, he was an outspoken opponent of McCarthyism, white racism, the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security Pact, and the Vietnam War and a supporter of the civil rights movement. Besides his prolific writings as a newpaperman, he was also the author of Shikago Nikkeijinshi, a history of Japanese-Americans in Chicago, published in 1968.Fujii Ryoichi [Japanese characters](1905-1983) was a bilingual Issei journalist, political commentator, and political activist. Born as Asano Katsu [Japanese characters] in Gifu city in Gifu Prefecture, he was known as “Bob” Fujii in English. A graduate of Doshisha University, Fujii came to the United States as a student in 1931. He attended Oberlin College from which he received a M.A. in 1934. Between 1936 and 1940, he was a member of the American Communist Party active in Southern California.
Extent
13 boxes (6.5 linear ft.)
Restrictions
Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.
Availability
COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.