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Finding Aid for the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press / Aztlan Publications Papers 1970 - 2007
36  
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Description
Founded in 1969, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press was partly responsible for the founding and flowering of Chicano studies in the 1970s—-launching the careers of young academics who could not find mainstream publishers.



This collection of materials from the press includes original submissions, production process materials, annual reports, and correspondence. While some of the reviewers' reports are still confidential and cannot be viewed by the public, most of the materials can be viewed.



**Please note that many accents have been eliminated in order to accomodate and facilitate the use of all types of web browsers.



Researchers who would like to indicate errors of fact or omissions in this finding aid can contact the research center at www.chicano.ucla.edu
Background
UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press Founded in 1969, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press was partly responsible for the founding and flowering of Chicano studies in the 1970s—-launching the careers of young academics who could not find mainstream publishers. For over three decades, the press, a vibrant small publisher, has remained at the forefront of the field of Latino studies and its books have regularly garnered international attention for breaking new ground. The press was reorganized in 1996 under the leadership of Chon A. Noriega and Wendy Belcher. Since then, the press has continued to publish a journal and books, as well as launching the Latino Policy & Issues Brief, the CSRC Research Report, and the CSRC monthly electronic newsletter. More recently, the A Ver Latino art series and Chicano Archives series was launched, as well as the Chicano Cinema and Media Arts series of DVDs. The special collection of materials from the press includes original submissions, production process materials, annual reports, and correspondence. While many of the reviewers' reports are still confidential and cannot be viewed by the public, some of the materials can be viewed. Previous Names of the Press Aztlán Publications, Chicano Studies Center, UCLA (1970) Chicano Studies Center-Publications, UCLA (1971-1979) Chicano Studies Research Center Publications, UCLA (1980-1992) UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Publications (1992-2002) Current full name: UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press (2003-) Books One of the center's first books was by the famous Chicano poet Alurista. The influential historian Rodolfo F. Acuña published his widely regarded history of East Los Angeles with the press. The prolific public health expert David Hayes-Bautista published his seminal No Longer a Minority, coining a phrase for the watershed changes occurring in California. Antonio Ríos-Bustamante published his ever-popular An Illustrated History of Mexican Los Angeles, 1781-1985. Magdalena Mora, Adelaida R. Del Castillo, Rosaura Sánchez, and Rosa Martínez were among the early Chicana scholars who published with the press. Recently the press published the first Zapotec-English dictionary in the world and the center's compilation of thirty years of the best articles in Chicano studies has been breaking sales records. Original submissions and reviewers' comments for many of the center's published books are archived. Journal The mainstay of the press is Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, one of the first academic journals to focus on Chicanos and to this day the premier journal in the field. Established in 1970, Aztlán publishes high-quality, original research relevant to or informed by the Chicano experience. The interdisciplinary, refereed journal is published semi-annually in 250-300 page issues. While the journal has a focus on scholarly essays in the humanities, social sciences, and arts, it also publishes thematic clusters of shorter articles in its dossier section, an artist's communiqué, and a review section. Aztlán seeks ways to bring Chicano studies into critical dialogue with Latino, ethnic, American, and global studies. Many of the artists and scholars who first published their work with the press have gone on to be renowned academics. Almost all the original submissions to the journal (whether accepted or rejected) are archived, along with the reviewers' reports and production process correspondence. "Aztlán ... signals the vibrancy of Chicano Studies." —The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2000 "The preeminent scholarly journal in Chicano Studies."—Magazines for Libraries, 1997 "This esteemed journal of record is essential for virtually all academic libraries."— Library Journal, 1997 Former Names of the Journal Aztlán: Chicano Journal of the Social Sciences and the Arts (1970-1974) Aztlán: International Journal of Chicano Studies Research (1975-1985) Current full name: Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies (1985-) Editors of the Journal 1996-present Chon A. Noriega 1987-1995 Raymund A. Paredes, Edit E. Villarreal, Carroll B. Johnson 1985-1986 Raymund A. Paredes, Manuel Miranda, Carlos P. Otero 1975-1984 Juan Gómez-Quiñones, Reynaldo F. Macías, Teresa McKenna 1972-1974 Juan Gómez-Quiñones, Reynaldo F. Macías, Andres Chavez, Deluvina Hernandez 1970-1971 Juan Gómez-Quiñones, Roberto Sifuentes, Reynaldo F. Macías, Andres Chavez, Deluvina Hernandez 1970 Juan Gómez-Quiñones, Roberto Sifuentes, Jaime Sena, Alfredo Cuellar, Reynaldo F. Macías, Andres Chavez, Deluvina Hernandez
Extent
Approx. 15 linear feet
Restrictions
For students and faculty researchers of UCLA, all others by permission only. Copyright has not been assigned to the Chicano Studies Research Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Archivist and/or the Librarian at the Chicano Studies Research Center Library. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
Access is available by appointment for UCLA student and faculty researchers as well as independent researchers. To view the collection or any part of it, please contact the archivist at archivist@chicano.ucla.edu or the librarian at yretter@chicano.ucla.edu