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Finding Aid for the Aida Hurtado L.E.S. Papers Vol. II 1990 - 1996
84  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Latino Eligibility Study, began in 1992 and was created to develop a clear understanding of the issues associated with the rate of Latino enrollment in higher education. It examined and assessed existing research and programs within and outside the University of California system and it expanded its understanding of the issues through acquisition of new data. The Latino Eligibility Study recommended policies, programs and other actions designed to improve future eligibility for Latinos in higher education.



This collection of papers and documents was assembled by Dr. Aida Hurtado of the University of California Santa Barbara for a Latino Eligibility Survey monograph.



Researchers who would like to indicate errors of fact or omissions in this finding aid can contact the research center at www.chicano.ucla.edu
Background
Aida Hurtado's research focuses on the effects of subordination on social identity, the part of the self that is related to significant group memberships. She is especially interested in those group memberships (e.g., ethnicity, race, class, and gender) that are derogated in this society and are used to legitimate unequal distribution of power between groups. Her multidisciplinary perspective has emerged from the social psychological literature on social identity and language attitudes, the methodological literature on surveys, and feminist theory. She uses a variety of methods ranging from ethnography to survey research, which is the core of her training.Aída Hurtado is currently Associate Professor of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz.
Extent
.5 linear feet
Restrictions
For students and faculty researchers of UCLA, all others by permission only. Copyright has not been assigned to the Chicano Studies Research Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Archivist and/or the Librarian at the Chicano Studies Research Center Library. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
Access is available by appointment for UCLA student and faculty researchers as well as independent researchers. To view the collection or any part of it, please contact the Center at www.chicano.ucla.edu