Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Guide to the Kimball Hale Dimmick Papers, 1837-1886
BANC MSS C-B 847  
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (185.88 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
 
 
Table of contents What's This?

List of Letters

Holograph Letters Written by Kimball Hale Dimmick: Fort Columbus, New York

item 1.

A.L.s., n.p., n.d. (probably written in August 1846).

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 16 mo.

Scope and Content Note

At top of letter, “No. 2nd.” Asks wife to attend a wedding in his absence and asks that she treat his “father and his people as kindly as you can. I will soon do better by you. That is I expect to have the means of doing to Tis' all I wish to live for.”
item 2.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus (Governor's Island, N.Y.), n.d. (August 1846).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He has been gone from home one week, misses the children, Frances and Charles, "but have courage and confidence in my return." He describes Fort Columbus, its battlements, routine duty, etc.
item 3.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 7 (1846).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

His officers are inexperienced, but the company is getting organized. "I think I shall like a soldier's life." A rumor that Mexico has offered terms of peace, which would end enlistments, but his company is "anxious for the war to continue." They will not sail (to California) before the 20th, and Kimball has confidence that "The God of Battles will shield me and nerve my arm in the hour of danger against my country's foes..." Generally, he is extremely regretful to leave his wife and children, but knows that "days of joy are yet to come."
item 4.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 13, 1846.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp, 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Expects to be paid soon, and will send money. In New York at the Western Hotel the previous day he was recognized as an officer and got "the greatest attention and respect paid to me." His is Company K, his Brevet Lieutenant, Wm. A. Cornwall of Albany: "I hope he will be a good fellow." -"We shall not leave here before Sept...I wish to proceed as soon as possible that I may sooner return to my family and friends."
item 5.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 14, 1846.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Implores Sarah not to grieve his departure, as her feelings, "Tis the most of my trouble." Promises his enduring love and fidelity while away. Concerning the expedition, "The Tribune sets it out worse than it is and the Herald much better." There is trouble in other companies, the men demanding their advance pay.
item 6.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 16, (1846).

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He has been gone two weeks and writes a tender letter expressing his love. Sarah's brother, George Holcomb, is expected to visit the fort. "The story in the papers about a volunteer being sentenced to be shot is all a humbug." -"We shall be ready to sail by the last of this week."
item 7.

A.L.s., n.p. (Fort Columbus), August 17, (1846).

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 10 1/2" x 12".

Scope and Content Note

Tells of thunderstorm and routine morning drills at the fort. He does not know when they will sale... "...Some of the companies are mutinous...two or three companies may refuse to sail." No trouble in his company, however, which has the reputation of "the most orderly and respectable of any in the Regiment." (next morning) "10 o'clock. We shall most certainly go and shall without much doubt be off next week."
item 8.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 21, (1846).

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

George is leaving the fort for home; Kimball will accompany him to the city (New York). Sends $125 to pay debts, and will try to arrange Sarah receiving 1/2 his pay. Asks her not to grieve, for the children' s sake, and pledges his love again.
item 9.

A.L.s., to his brother-in-law, George Holcomb, in Norwich, Western Hotel, New York, August 23, (1846).

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Herein he thanks George for his kindness to his family and asks that he do what he can for their comfort while he is gone. Mentions that he has empowered Sarah for the settlement of the estate.
item 10.

A.L.s., Western Hotel, New York, August 23, (1846).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo;

Scope and Content Note

"I walk forth honored in the crowd without a tremor in my limbs and behold our vessels fitting for sea with all the implements of death and destruction and contemplate their use with perfect composure --I step from off the big guns, enter my tent or a room alone and all my courage has fled and I sink to the child in feelings and actions." He gives his wife power of attorney. The Susan Drew is nearly loaded. He will sail in the Tom Perkins. The other ship is the “Su Chu” (Loo Choo).
item 11.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 24, (1846).

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Two friends, Mr. Berry and S. S. Barnes, have said they will help Sarah during Dimmick's absence. Reports are that they will not sail before the 10th or 15th of September. "From duty I intend never to shirk no matter what post she calls me to occupy."
item 12.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 26, 1846.

Physical Description: 2 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Lieutenant Cornwall turned out to be "a poor miserable wretch.....an unprincipled man...rotten with disease...neither did he possess any military talent." He was dismissed without any pay or uniform. "I cannot say anything good of Gen. S. **The expedition will not leave before the 15th of September. **(Sutherland)
item 13.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 28, 1846.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"The water here is very bad—and is the cause of the Summer complaint which (is) extensive in all companies." He is going to California because "necessity compels me to go. I have no other means of support." He speaks lovingly of the children, and keeps a lock of Frances's hair next to Sarah's in his bible.
item 14.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August 29, (1846).

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick asks his wife to visit him before he leaves, as she suggested. General DeForest arrived at the fort. Companies other than his own "are determined to have a row...and (I) do not care if they brake (sic) up the regiment."
item 15.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, August (31), (1846).

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

".....things pafs badly in our Regiment yet I do not doubt we shall sail and perhaps sooner than we expect. Thirty men deserted from Capt. Gaytors company....the men are dissatisfied through the Regiment," and "Other companies are deserting in fine style." But his company, as usualy (sic), is behaving. Testaments and Episcopal prayer books have been passed out.
item 16.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, Sept. 19, (1846).

Physical Description: 1-3/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Sept. 18th was payday. Dimmick's company refused unanimously to pay full price for their uniforms. "The Regiment is on the point of Breaking up....I do not think I shall ever go to California under Col. Stevenson. The Regiment is in a perfect State of Mutiny." Guards are posted and no man can leave the island. "It is all excitement. I fear not the result I only fear it will not break up the Expedition."
item 17.

A.L.s., Fort Columbus, Sept. 22, (1846).

Physical Description: 1 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"Glorious confusion reigns in Camp Polk." Col. Stevenson ordered the men to pay for their uniforms or take them off. Dimmick's men took them off. Dimmick put in his resignation, which did not go through. They may sail within two days or perhaps not at all. "The time has come for something decisive."
item 18.

A.L.s., aboard the Ship Loo Choo and en route to California, New York Harbor, Sept. 24, 1846.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

They will sail within two days. His men are making their own uniforms. "Stevenson's life is not worth a straw if he goes with the expedition." Two men, the second mate on Stevenson's ship, the Perkins,and a Spaniard in California "each swears to take the hearts blood of our Col....." But Dimmick is "safe in the hands of my men and blood will the soonest return me to my family and wife dearer to me than all."
item 19.

A.L.s., aboard the Loo Choo, New York Harbor, Sept. 25, (1846).

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"....the ship ... is ready to hoist her sails and pafs down the narrows to the Ocean." He expects to return in eighteen months, and asks Sarah to instruct the children in religion, and to give his love to his parents.
item 20.

A.L.s., aboard the Loo Choo, at Sea, (Sept. 1846).

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"The city of New York has faded from my view...." The wind is good and the men cheerful. "Be no more disconsolate I am very comfortably situated...."
item 21.

A.L.s., "Off the Harbor of Rio De Janiero," Nov. 15, 1846.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Fifty-one days from New York. He has been unable to write because of seasickness, and broods over domestic problems.
item 22.

A.L.s., to Mr. N. Pellet, n.p., Rio de Janiero, Nov. 24, 1846.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The ship's surgeon thinks he should return to New York on sick leave because of his seasickness, but "I am now unwilling to leave the expedition." Aboard the Perkins, Colonel Stevenson is "in difficulty up to his ears...and now wants to come aboard the Loo Choo." Orders prohibit his doing so. Description of the town, etc. One death so far on the voyage, and two births.
item 23.

A.L.s., (On board the Loo Choo), "Atlantic Ocean off Patigonia East," December 11, 1846.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Describes a storm at sea, and a whale. Mainly, he speaks of his love. Heading the letter is a cut of the Emperor Don Pedro Palace and buildings, at Rio.
24.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Large sheet of paper 17" x 22 1/4" folded into quarto and covered on both sides with writing. Four letters in all:
 

The first : "At Sea South West of Cape Horn in Lat. 58 degrees South," Dec. 27, 1846.

Scope and Content Note

Bad weather and seasickness. A perilous passage around the cape. Daniel Strong of Oxford went overboard and drowned, "an excellent man of good moral habits." Also, a man from the rescue boat, Lieutenant Gremmels, dropped dead upon returning to the ship. Dimmick feels himself to be "in the midst of death."
 

The second letter: "South Sea, Lat. 54 degrees, Lon. 76 degrees west," Jan. 3, 1857.

Scope and Content Note

More storms, and a lost spar. The New Year prompts him to recollect their early days together, even the "gloomy" ones, and hopes that he will return "in a situation of earning our support."--"The present inspires me with hope and courage."
 

The third letter: "Lat. 50 degrees, 49 minutes, Longitude 78 degrees West," Jan. 10, 1847.

Scope and Content Note

Across the miles, he asks Sarah to read with him from the Bible. The dangerous part of the voyage is past; they have hailed two ships, the whalers, Cowper and American, both at sea over four months and ignorant of the war with Mexico. An exchange is made, newspapers for potatoes from the Sandwich Islands.
 

The fourth letter: Valparaiso, Chili, South America, Jan. 18, 1847.

Scope and Content Note

They receive news that the Indians of lower California, led by Catholic Priests are killing Americans, "and if our news is true both Indian and priest will be treated by us as a common foe." His enlistment is up February 1st. "I may be home before you expect me. My future course depends on circumstances which I have not time to explain."
item 25.

A.L.s., To George Holcomb, his brother-in-law, Valparaiso, Chili, South America, January 21, 1847.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"We expect to have a small fight with the Indians and Catholic Priests when we arrive in California..." Description of the country, the Andes, and the inhabitants. The men are eager to get to California to "avenge the insult (the killings) before the Col. gets there. The Col. has not been heard from since we left Rio and hope to not hear again in some time."
item 26.

A.L.s., Valparaiso, January 23, (1847).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick wants "one chance at the California Catholic Priests and Indians and then come home immediately." The climate and weather is wonderful, and Dimmick expects to loose* two men, who prefer to stay ashore. One of the whalers they hailed, the Bark American, is in port; they lost the Captain and three men to a whale. "3 P.M. They are hoisting the anchor...we are off today."
item 27.

A.L.s., San Francisco, April 26, 1847.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8" x 13".

Scope and Content Note

Arrived a month ago, March 26th; "....you will be pleased to know what I am about in this land of our enimies.*" Describes duties, posting of sentinels, roll call, routine reports, etc. Detailed description of his quarters. He has bought a "tame cow." His men hunt deer and geese, and "occasionally amuse themselves shooting a wolf or bear as is most convenient." The Mexicans “are too lazy to occupy any portion of the earth."
item 28.

A.L.s., San Francisco, May 2, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8 1/4" x 13".

Scope and Content Note

There will be no fighting with Indians or Priests, "which may (be) a satisfaction to you but be assured it is now a source of discontent to me." If peace is declared with Mexico Dimmick says he will come home immediately. He is quite upset about not having received any letter from Sarah since leaving Fort Columbus.
item 29.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters on same sheet of paper.
 

The first, San Francisco, May 9, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Six weeks in California. The ships the Regiment came in are gone and the harbor almost deserted. Dimmick speaks of his strolls, the wild flowers, and his longing for home.
 

The second letter: San Francisco, May 10, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"Situated as I am in the most bleak and barren portion of California..." He thinks they may be discharged in August, and then there will be "some tall walking East ...."
item 30.

A.L.s., Presidio Barracks, San Francisco, May 23, 1847.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

A long and interesting description of a hike with two friends, and their meeting with a "Kiota," wild horses, and a party of Mexicans and Indians out after berries. Word is received from General Kearny telling of the insurrection at Santa Fe and the death of Governor Bent.
item 31.

A.L.s., San Francisco, June 27, 1847.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

No fighting and no prospects of fighting: "The country is in a State of Perfect Subjection." The soldiers want to go to Mexico and take Mazatlan and Acapulco, but Dimmick does "not expect we will have the privilege." He sends $200 home. "It is verry* healthy about this Bay," he remarks, commenting on his excellent health, but then closes with --"I hate the country, I dislike the climate and despize* the inhabitants.”
item 32.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Folio sheet written on both sides, three letters in all.
 

The first: San Francisco, July 4, 1857.

Scope and Content Note

"In this dreary land I expect nothing from civilized life and am not disappointed." At the celebration on this day, "K Company are the only sober Men here." At the mission, Dr. Semple spoke, "said to be a verry* weak affair." Comments on the agriculture of the region.
 

The second letter: San Francisco, July 5, 1847.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick is in high spirits, and includes in his ramblings those who happen to come into his office, the conversation, etc. He expects soon to be "winding my way to the Scenes of my early youth...."
 

The third letter: San Francisco, July 11, (1847).

Scope and Content Note

Very short note: he had sweet potatoes from the Sandwich Islands. "All well — but no news."
item 33.

A.L.s., San Francisco, July 24, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Again he sends money, "mindful of the welfare and happinefs* of yourself and our sweet children — of whom I have not heard a Syllable for most a year or since I left New York." — "Under all circumstances I think it best for me to remain in the Army a few months longer...."
item 34.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters, 8vo.
 

The first, United States Barracks, San Francisco, August 2, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Now I have the Command of the town including Fort Montgomery, The Block House and U.S. Barracks being the largest command and most important in the Northern California." Assuring Sarah of his safety, he describes the armaments of the Americans, saying if trouble arises he will "lay the town in ruins in five minutes." The natives, especially the Kanakas from the Sandwich Islands, are "Dirty-filthy beings..."
 

The second letter: San Francisco, August 7, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

A Mormon Battalion passes through on the way to the United States. At Sacramento, Monterey, and Los Angeles there is much sickness, but his men are healthy. The Navy is sailing to attack Mazatlan and Acapulco.
item 35.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters, 8vo.
 

The first: Presidio of San Francisco, August 12, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

Opens with 8 lines of original poetry. A love note, with deep regret that he has not yet heard from home.
 

The second letter: n.p. (San Francisco) Sept. 15, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 3/4 pp; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Men are sick and dying at Sacramento from typhoid fever, and the post there has been ordered abandoned. He has not seen Colonel Stevenson since landing in California. "Major Hardie has the immediate command of this district and for a young man is as great a Drunkard as there is in California." Dimmick will stay in the Army until the war is over, and asks Sarah to tell his daughter Frances that "Papa Will Come Home!"
item 36.

A.L.s.

Physical Description: Four letters.
 

The first: San Francisco, Sept. 26, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

"The governor of California (Mason) is now here and appears well. He is quite familiar with me. I have formed a good opinion of him." — "I feel as though I was in a land of Semi-Barbarians.. In fact there is no civilized Society here. Americans assimilate in character with the Miserable Native Inhabitants."
 

The second letter: Sonoma, Sept. 29, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

"(This) is said to be the best place in California." Short description of country.
 

The third letter: Sonoma, Sept. 30, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

Stayed the previous night "upon a bed" in the home of Mr. Lease, a trader. Called on Captain Braskett and General Vallejo. A discourse on the fierce Grizzly Bear; "Men are frequently killed and eaten by him."
 

The fourth letter: Corte Madera, Oct. 1, 1847.

Physical Description: 1/2 p.

Scope and Content Note

"I must say that this place is the most forlorn I ever saw." A detachment of his Company have built a saw mill there.
item 37.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters, 8vo.
 

The first: San Francisco, Oct. 2, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick threatens, in jest, to get married if he does not receive a letter from home. Governor Mason left for Monterey.
 

The second letter: n.p. (San Francisco), Oct. 3, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A love letter to Sarah: "...in the vineyard or the desert my prevailing thought is of you."
item 38.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Three letters, 8vo.
 

The first: San Francisco, Oct. 5, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick and a Sergeant went out after a "red Lion" that had killed a mule, Dimmick carrying a musket, "the best weapon in the world for an emergency." Dimmick, with fixed bayonet entered the brush where the lion lay and chased the animal out, but the beast got away only wounded in the flanks. He tells of the celebration at Mission Dolores on St. Francis's day and that the Mexicans got drunk and cut each other up a bit, "but the cowardly wretches killed no one."
 

The second letter: n.p. (San Francisco), Oct. 6, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

While Dimmick was in Sonoma a ball was given for Governor Mason, attended by the "Miserable Mexicans" and the soldiers. The Governor stayed only a few minutes. It was rather a drunken brawl, and the "little Major was put to bed in good Season."
 

The third letter: n.p., (San Francisco) Oct. 7, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

He speaks of the prevalence of the "Sacramento fever," but says he is in good health. "I expect to remain here till Spring." Dimmick includes his full address, "Genl. K. H. Dimmick, Captain 7th Regt N.Y. Volunteers, California, Care of Wm. L. Marcy, Sectry of War. Washington, D.C."
item 39.

Two letters,

Physical Description: 8vo.
 

The first, Monterey, Oct. 15, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

He left San Francisco the 8th of October. Describes the Brig Malek Adel and his voyage, anchoring the first night off "Sousaleti* - here is laid out the plan for a city which now consists of one store and one dwelling house." There they visited with Capt. Richardson. In Monterey: "I have just seen Alvarado the Mexican Governor of California. He appears like a verry* mild and inoffensive man but I suppose he is the same as other Mexicans a good man because a loaded cannon is pointed at his house from the American fort. These Spanish are wonderful good when we have them entirely in our power."
 

The second letter: Monterey, Oct. 16, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

"There has just been an execution of two Indians for Murder. They were executed by being hung...The Catholic Priest here pardoned the Culprits of Course and Sent them to heaven." He goes this day to San Francisco on horseback. "I do not believe there is a wagon or buggy in California."
item 40.

A.L.s., Monterey, Oct. 16, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The general is now numbering his letters to Sarah, and discusses the problem of the mails.
item 41.

A.L.s., San Francisco, Oct. 22, 1847.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8 5/8" x 12 3/4"

Scope and Content Note

A long description of the horseback journey to San Francisco, the land, rivers, villages (Santa Clara; "destined in the future to become the largest and best city in California"), Missions, and so forth. Especially fine description of the Mission at San Jose, "Delightful spot! Oasis of the Desert!" An excellent descriptive letter.
item 42.

A.L.s., San Francisco, Oct. 23, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"Brother is still armed against brother and Brother's blood waters the thirsty plains of Mexico...." When the war is over, we will come home.
item 43.

A.L.s, San Francisco, Nov. 21, 1847.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The men hunt wild geese, which they call a "wild goose chase." He talks of the weather, and for lack of a letter from Sarah pleads he knows not what to talk about, "because anything I might say of Miserable California must be as uninteresting to you as a description of the moon. The charm of this country must have passed away."
item 44.

A.L.s., San Francisco, Nov. 28, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

This letter goes around the horn. Dimmick talks of the mail service.
item 45.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters, 8vo.
 

The first: San Francisco, Dec. 1, 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Again, about the mail service, and letters. "Everyone most gets letters here from their Mothers and Sweethearts at home except a few whose near friends do not think enough about them to write."
 

The second letter: n.p. (San Francisco) Dec. 5, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 1/4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

He is well and the weather is good, "but in the country back from the Sea it is cold wet and mudy* and is as unpleasant a country as can be imagined."
item 46.

A.L.s., San Francisco, Dec. 7, (1847).

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 5 1/4 x 8 3/8".

Scope and Content Note

"I wish to see you and our sweet children yet I cannot wish you in this inhospitable region of half civilized Barbarians." — "I have seen enough of the Army to satisfy me. . (but) have not been gratified with a good fight."
item 47.

A.L.s., San Francisco, "Christmas Night," 1847.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He is the only officer in camp, and he broods of wife, children, and home. "There is no happiness for me in the enjoyment of any thing where you are not..." A lonely letter. "Nought disturbs the quiet night except the howl of the wolf..." And at the very end: "I have just received the news that four of our men have been killed at the city of Angelos."
item 48.

A.L.s., San Francisco, January 1, 1848.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The general describes the storm off the Cape of Good Hope a year ago. He hopes to come home this year, "for I regard the People here below and more to be despised than the Indians of our own country." A fellow officer remarked that his only satisfaction in California was to catch a fly and kill it or get drunk. On Christmas day a soldier was murdered, probably by an Indian, and an insurrection is expected in lower California. The General goes about well armed with knife and rifle: "I have learned to use such tools."
item 49.

A.L.s., San Francisco., February 1, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"We have heard a few balls whistle, but no Mexican dare get near enough to us to be capable of doing any injury." The Mexicans are "reconciled to our government." Mazatlan is taken, and Acapulco is expected to fall soon. At San Francisco they wait for recruits long overdue to arrive. Ships arrive from China bringing Chinese. "They look like superior being in comparrison* to the filthy low and niggardly appearance of the Mexican inhabitants of California."
item 50.

A.L.s., San Francisco, February 10, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The regiment may be sent to Mazatlan. Talk of the crops and weather. ".... I doubt if My Sarah lives.”
item 51.

A.L.s., Addressed: “To My Relatives and Friends in Chenango County." San Francisco, February 28, 1848.

Physical Description: 4 pp., 8vo. (with two inch section torn out of letter across the center).

Scope and Content Note

The general reviews his decision to go on the expedition, the voyage, and his sickness which almost forced him to return from Rio de Janiero (concerning this episode, a reference to "the inhuman Tyrant Stevenson"), etc. He pleads with his friends to tell him of his wife and children even if they are dead. He appears to believe that, for certain, one of his children is dead. "Will you inform me if I have a wife and child yet alive. Will you inform me if my reputation is so bad that no one will presume to write to me. If I am disinherited I desire to know it." At the end: "To Messrs George Holcomb, E. B. Dimmick and Others & c." Urgent and sincere; the man is in considerable despair.
item 52.

A.L.s., San Francisco, March 12, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

A letter from Sarah! dated July 10, 1847. She was ill the winter of 46-47, and their daughter, Frances, is dead. Dimmick grieves and talks of business at home, and $250 dollars missing which involves a man named Jennings. As to the war, "It seems that Mexico is to be destroyed by an unholy war waged by the United States." The general wants to go home.
item 53.

A.L.s., San Francisco, March 26, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Talk of his vegetable garden, and the scenery from a nearby hill. He treats her letter as does "a hen with one chicking.”* She yet owes him twenty-one letters, but "You need not trouble yourself to pay more than half the number and I will take the balance in something else."
item 54.

A.L.s., To his brother-in-law, George Holcomb, San Francisco, April 1, 1848.

Physical Description: 7 1/2 pp.; 94vo.

Scope and Content Note

Description of San Francisco from the barracks window, Kearny Street, Montgomery Street, Clay Street, and passers-by. "That man passing is nicked the Great Mogul, in consequence of his great self importance. He is the Star Editor. ....Here comes a drunken sailor mounted upon a mule...." And so forth, slandering Major Hardie, the daughter of General Don Valencia, the General's wife "the shape of a tub," the Alcade of the Mission of Dolores, "as drunk as common," Don Manuel Castro, "as dishonest a man as ever lived," & the Mexicans in general — “I wish we could provoke the cowards to have a little fight by way of variety." Ending with a very humorous observation on fleas and lice. Quite a letter.
item 55.

A.L.s., San Francisco, April 16, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Nothing much to say; hopes the war will be over soon, talks of the poor state of his clothes and says he is in new quarters. Conflicting news on the state of the war -or peace.
item 56.

A.L.s., Presidio, San Francisco, May 18, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The general was infected from a "poison bush" and swollen up for a while. Description of routine: "Our work...is repairing and mounting the guns upon the old Fort at the entrance of the Bay." The Mexicans say peace has been concluded.
item 57.

A.L.s., Presidio, San Francisco, July 4, 1848.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 12mo.

Scope and Content Note

The general is eager to be on his way home and looks forward to his welcome.
item 58.

A.L.s., San Francisco, August 2, 1948.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick is well, "in fighting order," as he puts it. Major Hardie joined the Catholic Church, and the general supposes that he will pass well with "the low and degraded Spanish or California people." News of the war is scarce.
item 59.

A.L.s., n.p, (San Francisco), August 2, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 5 1/4" x 6".

Scope and Content Note

He sends seven pennyweights of gold taken from mines, and describes the process of getting the gold and the look of the gold country.
item 60.

A.L.s., San Francisco, August 15, 1848.

Physical Description: 2 1/4 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

"The news of peace reached this place five days ago...." His command is honorably discharged and the general is closing accounts. He sends $50, and will remain a few months, "but if I find I cannot make it profitable I shall return home the first opportunity."
item 61.

A.L.s., San Francisco, August 23, 1848.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Although there is sickness on the Sacramento River, Dimmick concludes to visit the gold region as soon as he is released from duty. "I have now done with the Service of the United States forever."

Holograph Letters Written by Kimball Hale Dimmick: Discharged from the Army

item 62.

A.L.s., San Francisco, Sept. 3, 1848.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Now free from the service, Dimmick will try the mines, which "may prove a humbug." Still, he is provisioning for the trip and talks of thousands being made, men deserting from ships to go after gold, etc. The fever is upon him, and he is off.
item 63.

A.L.s., n.p., Sept. 10, (surely San Francisco-1848).

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 12mo.

Scope and Content Note

He will leave soon for Sacramento. Many are sick and dying at the mines, but conditions are improving somewhat.
item 64.

A.L.s., Sierra Nevada Mountains, Oct. 26, 1848.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick left San Francisco the 18th of September and on the 20th was in Sutter's Fort, and arrived in the mountains on the 25th. He was made judge in the mines to try some gold thieves, had one banished, another flogged. He is busy "meeting out Justice and making the laws," and has done little digging. He describes the country and a visit with Indians.
item 65.

A.L.s., San Francisco, January 1, 1849.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

A letter comes from "Henry" with a note enclosed from Sarah. He will resign his "office" and get ready to leave on the next steamer for Panama. Dimmick now has twenty-thousand dollars in lots in the city of Puebla. "There is no end to the rush here..." He sends $500.
item 66.

A.L.s., "Pueblo de San Jose,'' March 1,1849.

Physical Description: 7 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick left the mines in November, proceeded to San Jose and was made "Chief Judge and Ruler of this District” and has given "general satisfaction." -"I find myself complete governor and dictator of this portion of the country." He has about $10,000 and by fall should have double that amount.
item 67.

A.L.s., San Jose, April 10, 1849.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"... there is an undue excitement in the States about the gold of this country and ...multitudes are on their way to this land of disappointment." He explains the hardships one must suffer to profit in the mines, and says he will leave in the fall.
item 68.

A.L.s., Pueblo, (San Jose), April 25, (1849).

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 12 mo (several words torn off along side).

Scope and Content Note

He intends to send Sarah $1,000 if he can find a safe way to do it. "I shall surely come (home) by Spring."
item 69.

A.L.s., San Jose, May 1, 1849.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Most of the men are at the mines and the Judge has little to do. He is buying land, which he will sell when the people return from the mines. "I should be happy to have you here." He describes the gold rush as a "lottery."
item 70.

A.L.s., San Francisco, June 19, 1849.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Two letters received from Sarah. He will send her "from one to five-thousand dollars" by draft, and intends to buy a lot in San Jose in her name, hinting that she might like to come and live there.
item 71.

A.L.s, "Convention Chamber," Monterey, Oct. 1, 1849.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The Pueblo de San Jose is established as the permanent capitol of the State.
item 72.

A.L.s., San Francisco, November 14, 1849.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick has been ill — his handwriting is extremely shaky. He mentions a bill of exchange that might have been misdirected. "I unable to write more at this time."
item 73.

A.L.s., San Jose, December 25, 1849.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

There is word from home that "our mother died," and Dimmick is arranging his business to leave California. There is much poverty, sickness, and death in San Francisco and Sacramento. He speaks of his illness and return to San Jose. "On the 17th of this month I swore into office the first Legislature of the State of California and afterwards administered the oath to the governor..." After that he resigned his office.
item 74.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: Two letters, 8vo.
 

The first: San Jose, January 20, 1850.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Acknowledgement of a letter from Sarah, and talk about the dead child, Frances. He has refused high offices and is coming home on the next steamer. "California will without a doubt be a poor state."
 

The second letter: n.p., (San Jose) January 24, (1849).

Physical Description: 1 p.

Scope and Content Note

As soon as Dimmick converts his property into gold he is bound for home, "which I trust will be in a few weeks."
item 75.

A.L.s., n.p., n.d.

Physical Description: (The sheet is a postscript from a missing letter, very likely from San Jose and almost definitely in January, 1850.) 2 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick dined with F. Butler King, Senator to the U.S., and congressman. "The Senators say publickly* that my late sickness alone prevents me from filling one of the stations they now occupy."
item 76.

A.L.s., San Jose, February 26, 1850.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Still putting financial affairs in order. The Legislature wishes to put the capitol and State building on his land, and Dimmick wishes to conclude that business. "By the fifth of May I hope to be at home."
item 77.

A.L.s., Washington, D.C. Oct. 17, 1850.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Trying to get his "claims" settled by the Secretary of War. Mr. King is leaving again for California in November. Dimmick asks Sarah if she would wish to go to California.
item 78.

A.L.s., Washington, D.C., Oct. 23, 1850.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick sightsees in Washington, meets "Ned Buntline" and "Young Washington" at Mount Vernon. His claim is coming along fine. "I have made a great disturbance.. My impudence has only been equaled by my obstinacy."
item 79.

A.L.s., Irving House, New York, November 5, (1850).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He speaks of the election and comments on some of the candidates for Mayor. He mentions some friends he has seen in New York.
item 80.

A.L.s., New York, November 6, (1850).

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Steamers arrive from San Francisco with news of the fire. "I think (the fire) will be a benefit to that city..." The Whigs won the election.
item 81.

A.L.s., New York, November 11, 1850.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Concerning his claim, "the fact is the corrupt Demagogues want a small Bribe which they cant have from me." He hopes to be home in a week.
item 82.

A.L.s., New York, November 14, (1850).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I am yet here and only write to let you know that I have not gone to California." General Riley called on Dimmick, and said that Dimmick's "firmness and decision saved California from Highwaymen and Robbers.” More on his "claim," which makes his situation clearer. "Believing myself worth from fifty to one hundred thousand dollars I am driven to the Present nesesities* -and even sick of life.. If I have thus toiled and Suffered for nought then let me bid farewell to the world."
item 83.

A.L.s., New York, November 15, 1850.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"My accounts will soon all be paid." Dimmick will be home in a week and wonders if Sarah would like some furs. He signs his name an inch high with an elaborate flourish beneath it.
item 84.

A.L.s., Chageres, November 19, 1851.

Physical Description: 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

(A year almost to the day, has passed since the last letter in this collection.).
Dimmick is on his way to San Jose, seasick as usual.
item 85.

A.L.s, Panama, November 28, 1851.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8 vo.

Scope and Content Note

There is a great migration to California through the canal. Dimmick mentions an additional child, Willie.
item 86.

A.L.s., San Francisco, December 15, 1851.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Recovering from "Panama Fever," Dimmick hears the news that "everything is verry bad-and property of every description is worth nothing here." He has "affairs" to settle, and has heard nothing of them yet.
item 87.

A.L.s., San Francisco, January 18, 1852.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

--"... now you know the worst, I have been swindled, robbed of a fortune." Then come the awful details but "fortunes are here made as well as lost." He is in contact with Fremont Holmes, Howe, and General Greene. His embittered comment on California: "California is a curse to the world." He lays the fault mainly on gold. A postscript is added, dated January 20. He sends a draft.
item 88.

A.L.s., San Francisco, January 21, 1852.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He is going to Sacramento to collect some money due him, and then to Los Angeles "to be engaged in a printing office there," the Los Angeles Star.
item 89.

A.L.s., Sacramento, February 8, 1852.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

At first, learning of his losses, Dimmick was considering going to the "Diggins," but decided against it because of his health. He speaks of the hardships of mining gold. The steamer Hunt broke down on the way to Sacramento, stranding the passengers for 24 hours. He has been working for a week in a printing office and sends Sarah his full pay — $75. "I sometimes pay a dime for a glafs of milk. I dont eat eggs as they sell at three dollars and fifty cts per dozen."
item 90.

A.L.s.,

Physical Description: 21 pp. in a 24 mo booklet called Gregory's Express Pocket Letter Book, "designed to facilitate correspondence between cities and towns, and the mining districts in California... "

Scope and Content Note

He has received two letters from Sarah, for which he is grateful. Talk of the children. He has heard that Mr. King is at the mines. Now he is paid $50 a week, but can "overwork" to improve that. "There are not so many do well here is are supposed at home." Dimmick will try for a year to regain what he lost.
item 91.

A.L.s., Sacramento, March 13, 1852.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Sarah is being dunned at home and Dimmick instructs her an some financial matters. Sacramento is flooded.
item 92.

A.L.s., Sacramento, March 19, 1852.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"The waters are subsiding in the city one half of which is now above water." He has met an acquaintance from home and speaks of others in California. "I shall soon be off South."
item 93.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 7, 1852.

Physical Description: 48 pp.; 24 mo. (Express booklet full up).

Scope and Content Note

Three letters from Sarah. He discussed at length the money owed him in California and his debts at home, concluding that "I have no confidence in mankind." Talk of the children, and the naming of the youngest, William Henry. His return depends on the "freaks of fortune,” and he asks Sarah if she would want to come to California, and complement the state's agriculture, weather, etc. Dimmick's health is good; "I now weigh only 156 pounds. I used to weight 186. I weighed 175 pounds when I left home." So we have something of the proportions of the man.
item 94.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, July 11, 1852.

Physical Description: 39 1/2 pp.; 24 mo (Express booklet).

Scope and Content Note

He recounts his travels to San Diego of the past month, description of the countryside, Mission San Juan Capistrano (excellent), Mission Los Flores, and the Mission at San Luis Rey. On his return to Los Angeles with Mr. Judson and Mr. C. B. Smith they stopped off at the "Mormon town of San Bernardina." While there, "I saw nothing immoral or out of Character...but stories are bad against them." Dimmick ia now the District Attorney of Los Angeles, and is busy trying men for shooting one another.
item 95.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, July 16, (1852, from all appearances.)

Physical Description: 2 1/4 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

He sends coins and handkerchiefs and $50.
item 96.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, August 12, 1852.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick makes $1,000 a year as District Attorney, and is in some "humbug speculations." He is down to less than 150 pounds, but his health is good. Inquires about his parents and friends and comments on the fruit of the area.
item 97.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, August 31 (1852).

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The people are engaged in their vineyards and "everything is verry* dull here." "Plenty of work today — but poor pay ..."
item 98.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Sept. 1, 1852.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

The weather is warm, his health good.
item 99.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Sept. 11, 1852.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

More about his debts and his mortification at not being able to pay them. To save money, "I sleep on straw of my own in one corner of my room...this saves me four dollars per week for lodging." His room is $10 per month. He fears a box he sent, the contents worth $100, may have gotten lost. He is gaining weight.
item 100.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Sept. 16, 1852.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"The disappointed emigrants are arriving here daily from across the plains." A mention of "Mr. Fremont's Mariposa claim."
item 101.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Oct. 16, 1852.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick is working hard these days, and for a short while took the position of Postmaster, "but as it pays so little I think I shall resign immediately."
item 102.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Nov. 1, 1852.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

No word from Sarah for two months. "I trust you will keep up good courage. It will soon be better with us."
item 103.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Nov. 14, 1852.

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

No mail, and he frets. "Are our children sick or dead." Dimmick considers that prospects are growing better, and "I have grown more fleshy of late probably from eating freely of figs and grapes."
item 104.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Dec. 15, 1852.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Two letters from Sarah! "I think this surely shall be the last winter that we shall be so destitute or be separated."
item 105.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Dec. 26, 1852.

Physical Description: 3 1/4 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

With Christmas, depression for Dimmick, but he gives a nice description of the celebration in Los Angeles and a visit with a friend, the Christmas dinner, etc.
item 106.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Jan. 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

He sends some foreign coins, letters for the boys. The mail carrier to San Francisco is "supposed to be drowned crossing the River Santa Anna," so he sends this by way of San Diego.
item 107.

A.L.s., To his son, Charles, Los Angeles, Jan. 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 4 1/2" x 6 7/8".

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick sends a "fancy gold piece."
item 108.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Jan. 2, 1853.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Talk of the weather, and countryside, and the crops. "If we were free from debt and you were only here with me..I might once more be happy."
item 109.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Jan. 7, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

His health is good, and the weather warm.
item 110.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Feb. 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I mourn much because I am poor..." He sends Sarah $7. Word from a friend at the diggings who is making $5 a day. "If so he is doing better than one in a hundred at Mining."
item 111.

A.L.s, Los Angeles, March 6, 1853.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I have so many fears about me that I know not what to do." Some people from San Francisco are walking the streets with small pox, but there is no epidemic. "It seems as though no one of temperate habits is ever sick here. But Drunkards will die and ruffins* and Gamblers now and then get shot but it will be a fair place for honest men..."
item 112.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, April 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Concerning some business at home, the selling of the corner lot. He sends $2.50, and has "a prospect of doing better."
item 113.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, April 10, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Talk of the crops, his good health, the delightful climate. He sends all the money he has -$7.50.
item 114.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, April 16, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Working very hard at business. He sends $27.50.
item 115.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, May 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Sarah's letters are "a ray of hope and comfort to my gloomy pathway." He sends $2.50.
item 116.

A.L.s., To his son, Charles, Los Angeles, May 10, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

He sends a gift of a dollar, "But if Mother needs the dollar you must lend it to her and I must get another."
item 117.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, May 15, 1853.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 12mo.

Scope and Content Note

Apologies for the short letters and small paper, and encloses a letter for Charles with a dollar, and a half dollar for Frank. Also, $10 for Sarah. He asks to be remembered to friends, "and tell my enemies that I shall meet them again some day when they will see me."
item 118.

A.L.s., The letter to Charles., Los Angeles, May 15, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Frank got the most money last time, so the dollar is so that Charles won't be jealous. "... remember with love your unfortunate father." Sarah named the new baby "Frank instead of Willie," as Dimmick wanted.
item 119.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, May 29, 1853.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

The day before, Dimmick went to the Mission San Gabriel "To feret out and prosecute a band of horse thieves..." Talk of the crops, the scenery and dinner at a friend's house. The next day he will again be buys "...in the prosecution of culprits of a hard stamp." Before him on his table are several apricots offered as a bribe. He will eat them and "prosecute (the briber) with more vigour for his impudence — don't you see I'm desperate. Apricots sell in the Street 14 for 12 cts." He sends "one drop of gold."
item 120.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 1, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick makes account of the money has sent lately by mail in order to know if any was lost on the way.
item 121.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 15, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick asks if deeds to all his property at home arrived safely; he mailed them a year ago. His business is getting somewhat better.
item 122.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 24, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"Do not despair. We shall yet see better times." He sends $2.50.
item 123.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 30 (1853).

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I am well and doing as well as can be expected." He sends $5.00.
item 124.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, July 10, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick expects to do better in the next three months. The weather is warm.
item 125.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, July 30, 1853.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

In a recent letter he sent a "Slug” — a fifty dollar piece, and his previous letters have gotten to Sarah safely. He reflects on his losses, "worse than Roberies,*” and his debts. He sends $2.50.
item 126.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, August 13, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 3/4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

There is railroad activity at home, and Dimmick still thinks the corner lot "would make a good depot," and tells Sarah to sell it if she thinks best.
item 127.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Sept. 15, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He is well, and sends $2.50.
item 128.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Oct. 16, 1853.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"...our climate is the most delightful in the world," Dimmick says, and obviously his spirits are up. He now has an acquaintance with some "mediums," and is quite taken with the "most extraordinary and Singular effects of something called Spiritual Manifestations..." He finds comfort in this, associating it with the "guardian spirit" of his lost child, Frances, and finds it "No unhappy thought and if untrue can do no harm."
item 129.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Oct. 31, 1853.

Physical Description: 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He has received three letters from Sarah and promises to write better ones himself.
item 130.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Nov. 16, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Hard work has made him feel "unwell.” He sends $5.00.
item 131.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Nov. 20, 1853.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Very busy, Dimmick has just issued warrants for a murderer, a man who attempted murder, and a horse thief. He reviews his and Sarah's troubles, but finds some comfort still in his association with the mediums. For a year, but for one night, he has slept in his office.
item 132.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Dec. 2, 1853.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Sarah has been ill, but now is better. "I send you and the two boys each a piece of money according to size."
item 133.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Jan. 1, 1854.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I do not indulg* in the Hope of your ever coming to his country yet I might much desire it.." The weather is wonderful, and the food, too. For New Year's, he sends "a little piece of money."
item 134.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Feb. 17, 1854.

Physical Description: 1/2 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I have today written you a long letter by way of San Francisco in reply to your jealous letter of Dec. 16."
item 135.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, March 5, 1854.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick has made a trade that gives him a house worth $1000, and he questions Sarah about coming to California.
item 136.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, March 18, 1854.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

He sends only $2.50, fearing some previous letters have miscarried. No mail for six weeks. Again he works at Sarah with the beautiful weather, and says she would live in California "respected free from the miserable blights of the self conceited sectarian prejudice of Norwich." Dimmick is reading A. J. Davis and is now quite involved with the spirit world.
item 137.

A.L.s., Letter from Sarah, Los Angeles, May 25, 1854.

Physical Description: 1 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

$20 is probably lost in the mails, but Dimmick grieves as much for the loss of good love letters as much as for the money. He sends $10, and hereafter says that he will send money in one letter, love in another.
item 138.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 8, 1854.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I have a strong desire to make this city my home." Again he urges Sarah to consider joining him. "It seems as though I could not live longer without seeing you."
item 139.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 11, 1854.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Sarah is considering coming to California. Dimmick helps along her decision by speaking of a "set of the pimps of would be aristocracy in Norwich." He instructs her in some legal affairs at home and describes some of his furniture. As to her welfare in California, "The laws of this State are extremely liberal in protecting the property of the wife."
item 140.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 21, 1854.

Physical Description: 5 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Trouble at home. "I cannot believe that Edmond (Dimmick' s brother) will hand over that mortgage to be foreclosed." Sarah's house is in danger of being sold, and Sarah is in poor health. Dimmick must raise $50 if the foreclosure action continues.
item 141.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, June 23, 1854.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick describes the adobe house on his lot and says he will build a brick house for Sarah. Within an hour he will marry an American man and a Spanish girl, and will send the marriage fee. Neither the bride nor groom know each other's language, "but other things they may have now in common.” — "I have been living last year very comfortable."
item 142.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, August 3, 1854.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Discussion of the mails, which is "verry* badly arranged..." Dimmick sends a newspaper in which he has a one-third interest, and says he can secure a ticket to California for Sarah "by saying sweet things in our paper for the Steam-company. That is the custom for printers in California."
item 143.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Oct. 27, (1854).

Physical Description: 1/2 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"I have been absent from Los Angeles about four weeks." He sends $20.
item 144.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Jan. 25, 1855.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

"You do not say much lately about coming to California." If she will not come, he will go to Norwich. A reference to Edmond and his "thieving." Dimmick is now County Judge at $1500 per year.
item 145.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Feb. 5, 1855.

Physical Description: 4 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

A letter from Sarah reprimanding Dimmick "for not having provided better for my family.." He has made arrangements to send Sarah money to get her started for California around May or June. He instructs Sarah on how to settle with Edmond.
item 146.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, Feb. 6, 1855.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

More business concerning the property in Norwich. He has written a "hard letter" to Edmond, and wants a definite answer if Sarah will come to California, and when.
item 147.

A.L.s., Los Angeles, March 8, 1855.

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

More instruction about the mortgage and Edmond, and settling that business. Dimmick has sent Sarah full power of attorney to handle the property, judgments, etc., and awaits her answer about coming to California. He concludes: "I beg you will send me your letters on a whole sheet of papper if you should write but one line. I have a superstitious notion which makes me feel verry unpleasant on receiving a letter on a torn sheet." That is the last letter to Sarah in the collection.
item 148.

A.L.s., To Rev. B. W. Gorham, Los Angeles, Dec. 11, 1860.

Physical Description: 8 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Having received a letter dated November 6, Dimmick answers the Reverend concerning his coming to California ("with but a dollar in my pocket... and without a blanket"), and its consequences. Evidently, Gorham is writing on behalf of Sarah, from whom Dimmick has not received a letter since around 1855. First, Dimmick heard that she was dead, then that she believed he was living with another woman, which "is false and without the least shadow of a foundation." He wants Sarah to come to California still, and wants her to write. He speaks highly of California, and closes with his hopes of better years to come...and with Sarah.
item 149.

A.L.s., (fragment) n.p., n.d. (probably early 1847).

Physical Description: 3 1/8" x 5 1/8" covered on both sides.

Scope and Content Note

Something about Panama and a reference to Frances and Charles.
item 150.

A.L.s., (fragment) To Charles and Kimball W. Dimmick, n.p., n.d. (1847-8?).

Physical Description: 4 1/2" x 6 7/8” covered on both sides.

Scope and Content Note

The adventures of Drunken squaws and fighting Indians.

Miscellaneous Items in the Kimball Hale Dimmick Collection Two Letters of Sarah Dimmick

item 1.

A.L.s., To her son, Frank, (Norwich), Sept. 24, (1861).

Physical Description: 3 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

"Your poor father is no more. He died in Los Angeles September 8th Sunday morning, of desease of the heart." Dimmick had recently been appointed United States District Attorney for the Southern District of California. Sarah mentions the letter (No. 146) written to Rev. Gorham and will write to see if anything is left for the children in California.
item 2.

A.L.s., To her son, Charles, n.p., August 22, 1886.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 12 mo.

Scope and Content Note

Sarah scolds him for being careless with his father's letters, and asks what became of the family bible, which had records in it. Among the letters she speaks of (not in the collection) is one from the Postmaster at Los Angeles at the time of Dimmick's death which says that Dimmick's property was mortgaged.
 

Dimmick, Kimball H., Holograph, December 25, 1839.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

“Composition Read in School.” About Christmas and the Saviour.
 

Dimock, Davis., A.L.s., Montrose, June 30, 1851.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

A letter to Kimball H. Dimmick. An answer to Dimmick concerning the genealogy of the Dimmicks.
 

Document. July 17, 1837.

Physical Description: 9 3/4" x 15 1/2"

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kimbel H. Dimock (sic) as Quarter Master of the 105th Regiment of Infantry...Signed by William L. Marcy, Governor of New York.
 

Document. August 24, 1839.

Physical Description: 7 3/8" x 8 3/4"

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kimball H. Dimmick as a "VISITER" of the Common Schools.
 

Document. July 23, 1839.

Physical Description: 10" x 15 3/8".

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kimball H. Dimmick as Adjutant of the 105th Regiment of Infantry... Signed by William H. Seward, Governor of New York.
 

Document. September 30, 1839.

Physical Description: 10" x 15 1/4"

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kemball H. Dimmick (sic) as Major of the 105th Regiment of Infantry.... Signed by William H. Seward, Governor of New York.
 

Document. September 9, 1840.

Physical Description: 9 7/8" x 15 1/8"

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kimball H. Dimmick as Colonel of the 105th Regiment of Infantry... Signed by William H. Seward, Governor of New York.
 

Document.

Physical Description: 7 5/8" x 12 3/8"

Scope and Content Note

License permitting Dimmick to practice as Attorney and Proctor, and Solicitor in the Court of the Northern District of New York. Signed by Anson Little, Clerk.
 

Document. January 14, 1842.

Physical Description: 11" x 13 1/4"

Scope and Content Note

License permitting Dimmick to practice as an attorney in New York State Supreme Court. Signed by Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice.
 

Document. January 18, 1842.

Physical Description: 9 5/8" x 10 5/8"

Scope and Content Note

License permitting Kimball H. Dimmick to act as Solicitor in the Court of Chancery of the State of New York. Signed, R. Hyde Walworth, Chancellor of the State of New York.
 

Document. May 9, 1843.

Physical Description: 8" x 12 5/8"

Scope and Content Note

Admitting Kimball H. Dimmick as Attorney and Counsellor in the Court of Chenango County, New York. Holograph, signed by John Latham, Clerk of Chenango County.
 

Document. June 7, 1843.

Physical Description: 7 7/8" x 10 1/2"

Scope and Content Note

Admitting Kimball H. Dimmick as Attorney and Counsellor in the Court of Allegany County, New York. Holograph, signed by Samuel C. Wilson, First Judge of the Court of Common Pleas.
 

Document. February 16, 1843.

Physical Description: 7 5/8" x 9 7/8"

Scope and Content Note

General Orders. Honorable Discharge. Accepting the resignation of Kimball H. Dimmick, Brig. General of the 32nd Brigade of Infantry. Albany. By Lyman Lanford, Adjutant-General.
 

Temple, R. E. (Adjutant General, Albany) A.L.s., Albany, July 10, 1846.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

To Captain Kimball H. Dimmick, Norwich. Asking for a roll of Kimball's company, and informs him that the company will form with other as a regiment, at which time field officers will be selected. Temple has hopes of completing the Regiment with ten days.
 

Cox, Abigail H., Holograph poem. Plymouth, March 6, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

“Acrostic on the Death of Frances Augusta Dimmick." — "From a sorrowing world of sin & pain, sweet cherub, you are gone.." And on like that for twenty-two lines. Dimmick received this piece, or a copy of it, with one of his letters.
 

Invoice of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores delivered at San Francisco to Capt. Kimball H. Dimmick. August 15, 1848.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Muskets, swords, waist belts, screw drivers, &c. Signed by Lieut. James A. Hardie.
 

Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand at arrival in San Francisco, (San Francisco), March 31, 1847.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8" x 12 1/2"

Scope and Content Note

Muskets, swords, etc., issued and account of supplies lost on voyage. Signed by Kimball H. Dimmick.
 

Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, August 9, 1848.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Letter from Ordnance Office, Washington, acknowledging Dimmick's report of stores the first quarter of 1848.
 

Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, August 11, 1848.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Letter from Ordnance Office, Washington, acknowledging Dimmick's report of stores the four quarters of 1847.
 

Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, August 15, 1848.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Invoice of stores turned over by Dimmick to Lt. Hardie. Muskets, etc. Signed by Lieut. James A. Hardie.
 

Townsend, John (1st Alcade of San Francisco), Holograph, April 15, 1848.

Physical Description: 2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

On the order of Colonel Stevenson, Dimmick has been made to account for several items lost on the voyage to California: fourteen hatchets, twenty-five bed sacks, drum heads, ten poles, etc. Dimmick swears that they were lost overboard off the Cape, and signs his name to it. Below that, Sergeant Sellers swears to it also, stating that proper diligence had been exercised to preserve the public property.
 

Ordnance Stores, Washington, Jan. 20, 1849.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Acknowledgement of return of certain supplies by Dimmick.
 

Document. Holograph. Oct. 26, 1949.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Appointment of Kimball H. Dimmick a Judge of the Superior Tribunal of California, to date from November 1, 1949. Signed by Bennet Riley, Brig. General, U.S. Army, and Governor of California.
On second page is Kimball's oath of office written out by him and signed on November 30, 1848.
 

Halluk, H. W., A.L.s, Monterey, May 17, 1849.

Physical Description: 1/2 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

To Kimball H. Dimmick, 1st Alcade, District of San Jose. Acknowledgment of Dimmick's letter concerning the case of Antonia Valencia, and stating that 1st Alcaldes have jurisdiction in criminal cases.
 

Belt, Geo. G., Holograph note, San Jose, Aug. 10, 1849.

Physical Description: l p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Addressed to Mr. Thomas Lines instructing him to pay Capt. K. H. Dimmick seventy dollars.
 

Inventory. Holograph, n.p., n.d.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 7 3/8" x 12".

Scope and Content Note

A listing of household goods and their prices, totaling $150, the items possibly from Sarah's home in Norwich.
 

Document. Binghamton, May 19, 1841.

Physical Description: 1 p.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Legal document, a debt: "Whereas Samuel Standlay is indebted to Charles G. Hunt....the sum of two hundred dollars."
 

Document. The Constitution of California.

Physical Description: Facsimiles of the original, 14" x 21 5/8". Piece torn from upper left corner.

Scope and Content Note

Dimmick's signature is among the signers.
 

Riley, B., A.L.s., New York, November 14, 1850.

Physical Description: 2 1/2 pp.; 8vo.

Scope and Content Note

Addressed to the “Honorable Millard Fillmore President of the United States." Introducing Kimball H. Dimmick and referring him favorably for his services in California. General Riley recommends that Dimmick receive an appointment of judge of the United States Courts. He is "an honest man...a lawyer of good ability and has a thorough knowledge of (California)."
 

Award Cup,

Physical Description: approx. 4 1/4" high. Silver.

Scope and Content Note

Inscribed on cup, "Used by Genl. K. H. Dimmick in the Mexican War and at Fort Hamilton. 1849."